Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1534) 21.09.21-1

The health emergency has had major repercussions on the performance of the footwear sector in the first half of the year, with a fall in national production and company turnover in the region of -35%. In terms of consumption, household spending is down 30%, despite the big increase in online purchases (+42%) resulting from shops closing as part of restrictive measures. The post lockdown restart is proving to be extremely slow: sales in Italy are still down (-29% in quantity in May and -7% in June), whereas exports were down -27% in volume for May and June after the collapse (-50%) in the previous two months.

The first six months of the year closed with across-the-board reductions for foreign sales: -22% in quantity for EU markets and -33.4% in non-EU markets, with a sharp reduction in the balance of payments surplus (-34%).

The number of companies continues to fall (-77 since the start of the year) along with the workforce (-520), and concern remains high over employment figures in the coming months. Recourse to wages support soared in the leather area: +878% for the period January-June.

As with all other sectors in the Italian Textile Fashion and Accessories Industry, the first half of 2020 came to a close with markedly negative data for all the main economic variables in the footwear sector and with apprehension in terms of performance in the coming months.

The spread of the health emergency – which began in China and quickly took hold all over the globe – led to many countries adopting strict restrictive measures, which heavily affected the ordinary course of production activities and trading at both a national and international level. The combined shock on supply and demand, which began in March, also affected the Italian economy, with highly disruptive effects and a great deal of uncertainty surrounding the potential duration of these effects.

The data produced by Confindustria Moda Research Centre for Assocalzaturifici describe the collapse suffered during the lockdown period, which followed hard on the heels of an already lacklustre start to the year. Indeed, while the first two months of 2020 were not particularly brilliant – as exports fell by -4.6% in quantity, despite remaining fairly stable in value at +1.5%, domestic consumption continued the slow process of erosion that has been ongoing for years – the closing of companies and shops in Italy and the major slowdown in foreign demand following the outbreak of the health emergency, has severely tested Italy's productive fabric. The system mainly comprises small and medium/small businesses that have been forced to contend with a lack of liquidity caused by the cancellation of orders, returns and unpaid invoices.

The resumption of business in May did not result in the strong recovery that was hoped for, with trends for orders remaining very sluggish at both a national and international level, and the picture remained much the same during the month of June. Inevitably, therefore, the figures for the final balance in the first half of the year are very negative:

• the results of the survey conducted in July on a sample of members show an average year-on-year decrease in turnover, for the first six months of the year, of -36.3%, with an estimated overall loss for the sector as a whole of 2.6 billion Euro. A sizeable 1/3 of respondents reported reductions in excess of 50% for the second quarter. Even the collection of orders was very negative (-30.2% compared to April-June 2019), thus highlighting the fact that the collapse in demand caused by the pandemic is far from over.

• The figures collected by Confindustria Moda Research Centre are in line with Istat’s monthly data on industrial production performance. For the item "Footwear manufacturing", after the collapse in March (-55.1%) and April (-89.3%), the Istat index continues to hover around profoundly unsatisfactory levels despite the reopening of factories (-38.9% in May and -23.2% in June). The cumulative total for the first six months of 2020 represents a -34.9% year-on-year fall.

•The performance of domestic consumption in the first six months of 2020 was obviously affected by the two-month suspension in physical sales, aside from a lower consumption propensity by households as a result of the difficult economic period and insecurity over employment, not to mention the general climate of mistrust and uncertainty brought about by the pandemic. To top this off, there was also the drastic reduction in tourism.

The domestic market has always been crucial: even though 85% of Italian production is exported, Italy remains the third largest destination market for Italian footwear manufacturers in terms of volume.

For the first six months of the year Sita Ricerca’s Fashion consumer panel for Assocalzaturifici shows a reduction in household consumption of -25% in volume and -30% in total expenditure, with average prices down -6.6% on a year-on-year basis (including as a result of a greater prevalence of slippers and lounge footwear during the lockdown period. This particular segment fell by a "less severe" -14 percent in quantity due to the relative increase in the use of this type of footwear when people were at home).

After reductions in the order of -60% in March-April, despite the reopening of stores, May was still significantly below par (-29% in volume and -37% in expenditure), while the reduction in the number of pairs of shoes sold in June was limited to single digits (-7.1%).

There were across-the-board reductions for all merceological segments with similar reductions in excess of 30% in volume and value compared to the first six months of 2019 for "classic" shoes for men and women; -23% in quantity for children's footwear and -25.3% for sports shoes and sneakers. As mentioned above, the reduction was less severe – albeit still in double digit territory – for the slippers and lounge footwear segment, which fell by -14% in volume and -12% in value terms.

Sita Ricerca’s analysis on sales channels shows a predictable boom in online purchases, with increases of +60% in volume and +42.2% in value for the first half of 2020. Online shopping's share of the total market (following the trend for recent years) went from 14.1% of the final balance in 2019 to the current level of 26.5%. Just seven years ago, in 2013, online purchases accounted for a mere 3.6% of Italian families' purchases of footwear.

On the other hand, all other sales channels closed the first half of 2020 with major losses: -40% in volume for the traditional retail sector; -51% for itinerant traders and around -37% for retail chains, department stores and large specialised stores.

• In terms of exports, in the first six months of the year the Istat data show a reduction in quantity of -26.4% and a -25.4% reduction in value terms (with average prices up slightly, +1.3%).

After outgoing flows halved in the period March- April (with a record fall in excess of -70% in both volume and value in April), the trend for May was still very negative (with reductions in the order of -40%), while the reduction in June was more limited (around -15%).

A total of 78.7 million were exported for a value of 3.8 billion – including pure commercialisation transactions – which represented a drop of more than 28 million pairs compared to the first six months of 2019.

To understand how exceptional the current situation is, it is sufficient to state that these volumes are 24% lower than for the same period in 2009, in the full throes of the global economic crisis (when footwear exports amounted to 104 million pairs).

The assessment by merceological type highlights reductions of more than 20% in volume for all segments, except for the residual segment of footwear with rubber uppers (-1%): there were reductions of just over -30% for leather shoes (with similar falls, i.e. -34%, for the men and women segments and -30% for children's shoes); -23% in quantity for shoes made in fabric; -21% for synthetic shoes and -38% for slippers.

Breakdown by geographic area reveals a significant drop both within the EU (considering 27 countries this year, following Brexit) and outside the EU.

Flows to EU markets (which account for 2 pairs out of every 3 sold abroad) were down -22% in terms of volume and -21% in terms of value, while exports outside the EU shrank even further (-33.4% in terms of quantity and -28.8% in value).

There were across-the-board reductions across global markets, with very few exceptions: among the main destination markets there were increases only for Poland and Portugal (which lost 11.4% in value terms); South Korea had a +0.6% in value, with -4.6% in quantity.

There is a prevalence of negative figures everywhere. Germany, the number one market in volume terms, that had already shown a negative trend in 2019, fell by 17%, for both volume and value. There were strong falls in flows towards China and Hong Kong (-31.4% and -44.1% in value respectively) with the Far East losing about 30% on the whole, in both quantity and value. There was a significant slip in the CIS markets (-37% in volume and -30% in value); performance was bad in the US (almost -40%) and the Middle East (-26% in quantity). Volume towards Switzerland (the traditional logistics and distribution hub for the major international luxury brands) fell by about a quarter and there was a fall of about a third towards France (another main destination for contract manufacturing), the countries occupying the first two spots in the value league table.

Breaking the figures (for footwear + parts, in value terms only) down on a geographical level, there were significant falls during the first half of the year for all the main exporting regions, with the sole exception of Emilia Romagna (+20%) which was driven by Piacenza, a logistics and distribution hub that has been growing constantly in recent years given its fundamental importance in the delivery of goods purchased online. The biggest reductions concerned Tuscany (-44%), the Marche (that fell by -32.5% on the whole, with Fermo and Macerata falling by -31% and Ascoli Piceno falling -39%) and Campania (-34%). There were reductions in line with the national average for Lombardy (-25.1%), that fared slightly worse than Veneto (-20.2%, this is Italy’s biggest exporting region with a share of 27.4% on the total value of Italian exports), Puglia (-22.2%) and Piedmont (-20.9%).

Florence remains the leading province for exports despite losing -43.7% on a year-on-year basis during the first six months of 2020.

• In terms of imports, Istat data show a reduction in the order of -18%, in both quantity and value: between January and June, 148.1 million pairs of shoes were brought into Italy, i.e. 34 million less than for the same period in 2019. The marked fall in domestic consumption and the operational difficulties experienced by importers during the lockdown also significantly reduced volumes of incoming footwear (for March and April the reduction exceeded -40%).

There were across-the-board decreases for all segments: reductions for leather shoes (-18% in volume and -19.6% in value) were in line with the overall average across all segments.

The reduction in goods from China (-15.4% in volume and -8.2% in value) was nevertheless more limited than reductions experienced by other non-Chinese suppliers (these were in the region of -20% in both volume and value terms). Despite an increase of 8.5%, the average price of Chinese products (6.23 Euro/pair) is almost three and a half times lower than products from other countries.

• The trade balance for the sector for the first six months of the year remained positive by 1.6 billion Euro, despite shrinking by -33.8%.

• Data relating to company demographics and employment continued the negative trends that have been ongoing for some while. These figures obviously do not yet show – due to registration time lags and because of the measures taken by the government ('Cure Italy' and 'Relaunch' decrees) that blocked sackings – the effects a crisis of this magnitude will certainly have on the country's manufacturing and productive fabric.

A survey by Confindustria Moda revealed that in July 10% of companies still had their staff working remotely.

For footwear manufacturers, at the end of June 2020, there were 4,249 companies and a workforce of 74,370 in Italy across industrial and craftsmanship sectors (with a decrease of -77 companies and -520 workers compared to December 2019).

Considering also components, the reduction from the start of the year increases to -161 companies and -1,295 workers according to Infocamere-Movimprese. A geographical breakdown is available for these chamber of commerce figures, which shows – in terms of the number of companies trading – a reduction in all seven of the main footwear manufacturing regions, with the sole exception of Campania (where there are 3 more companies compared to the final figures for 2019). In the Marche, that has been heavily affected in recent years by the crisis of the Russian market, we see the biggest reductions in absolute terms (-63 units); followed by Tuscany (-43) and Lombardy (-21).

With regard to workforces – where all the main districts, with no exceptions, experienced reductions – once again it is the Marche that experienced the biggest fall (-445 workers, -2% down on December 2019), followed by Veneto (-284 workers) and Tuscany (-267).

This negative trend is unfortunately bound to worsen in the following months, when official data becomes available on the number of companies that have not been able to get through this extremely delicate economic situation.

• Figures published by INPS relating to authorised CIG wage support in the Leather Supply Chain fully capture the severity of the current situation.

As revealed by the surveys by Confindutria Moda – during the survey conducted in July more than 97% of companies in the sample stated they had made use of social security schemes since the start of the health emergency, with 77% of the total workforce having tapped into these – authorised CIG hours saw extraordinary increases starting from the month of April.

After the reduction during the first quarter (-10.5% down on the same period in 2019), in April 2020, 23.9 million hours were authorised for the leather supply chain (a +2871% year-on-year increase), while the figures for May and June were 7.5 million hours (+1633%) and 5.7 million hours (+651%) respectively.

On the whole, for the first six months of 2020, a total of just under 39 million hours were authorised, a jump of +878% compared to the number of authorised hours during the first half of 2019 (4 million). This was almost 5 times the number of hours authorised during 2019 as a whole (8.3 million hours).

Never in the past has the number of authorised hours been so high, not even during the global economic crisis that began at the end of 2008. Between January and June 2020, more hours were authorised than during all of 2009 (23.1 million) and all of 2010 (29.7 million).

Tuscany (with about 10 million hours authorised) saw the biggest increase, in both absolute and percentage terms (+3080% compared to the first half of 2019), but there were large increases for all the main districts in the leather supply chain.

The expectations for the second half of the year – considering also the rise in the number of cases in many countries, including Italy, where it had appeared the virus was progressively waning – must necessarily recognise the uncertainty and the need for caution, especially when considering the time required to return to “normal” levels of business.

Almost 3/4 of companies (73.5%) have had to revise their scheduled investment plans because of the pandemic.

In response to the question about forecasts for turnover for 2020 as a whole compared to 2019 – assuming the health situation does not worsen in autumn – half of the footwear manufacturers involved in the survey by Confindustria Moda thought the drop would be in the range of 20-50%. Only 5% of the sample believed they would reach 2019 levels and an even smaller share of respondents (1%), believed they would end the year up on 2019.

When the responses are weighted based on company size, the forecast for turnover in the sector points to a reduction of around -24% (which would represent a loss of 3.4 billion Euro). This is clearly a preliminary assessment based on a sample which was conducted with more than five months left to run in the year. It is subject to the uncertain development of the healthcare emergency around the world in the coming months but, nevertheless, it does give an indication of the severity of the impact Covid-19 will have on the performance of the sector.

Milan, 16 September 2020

Copyright © 2021 Assocalzaturifici.
All rights reserved.
Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1517) 02.08.21-2

 

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Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1512) 07.07.21-2
THE FOOTWEAR INDUSTRY: TENTATIVE RECOVERY FOR EXPORT (+3% IN VALUE TERMS) IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2021 BUT WE’RE STILL NOWHERE NEAR PRE-COVID LEVELS.

Siro Badon, Chair of Assocalzaturifici: “The recovery is still a long way off but the weakening of the severity of the pandemic means we can see some light at the end of the tunnel”


THE FOOTWEAR INDUSTRY: TENTATIVE RECOVERY FOR EXPORT (+3% IN VALUE TERMS) IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2021 BUT WE’RE STILL NOWHERE NEAR PRE-COVID LEVELS

The snapshot for the sector from the Confindustria Moda Research Centre for Assocalzaturifici



Regional geography of exports: positive performances from Tuscany (+28.7% on the first 3 months of 2020), Veneto (+6.2%), Piedmont (+11.5%) and Puglia (+2.5%); downturn for Marche (-11.7%) and Emilia Romagna (-32.1%); Lombardy is stable (-0.7%). In the league table for provinces, there was a giant leap forward for Florence (+44%, with +16% increase compared even with the first quarter of 2019), that sits comfortably in the top spot (with an 18.2% share of the national total).
Company demographics: compared to December there was a reduction of -123 companies and -587 workers amongst manufactures of footwear and components

Tentative signs of a resurgence in the first quarter 2021 for the footwear industry thanks to exports (+0.3% in quantity and +3% in value) but pre-covid levels remain out of grasp. According to the latest figures from the Confindustria Moda Research Centre for Assocalzaturifici, after the unprecedented crashes in 2020, which saw the loss of about 1/4 in turnover and national production, the gradual improvement in the epidemiological situation and the resulting easing of covid restrictions in Italy and many other countries, has driven a return to slightly less negative business levels in early 2021 compared to the previous quarters, but the figures remain significantly below par.

“The recovery is still a long way off but the weakening of the severity of the pandemic means we can see some light at the end of the tunnel – explains Siro Badon, Chair of Assocalzaturifici – On the foreign front the rebound in March was at least sufficient to bring results for the quarter back to early 2020 levels, but the same cannot be said about the Italian market, where the closure of stores in shopping centres on weekends - that was only revoked last May - caused a further reduction in household consumption compared to the first 3 months of 2020. A recovery will take some time and there will be hefty consequences in terms of selection amongst companies and employment trends. In particular, production in the first quarter is down -6.4% compared to January-March 2020 and by about -30% from the same period in 2019, prior to the start of the pandemic. In the Italian market, purchases are down -3.5% in quantity and -6.9% in terms of expenditure, with a shortfall of more than -20% on 2019 levels.”

Assocalzaturifici’s report also shows that the average price per pair of shoes bought by Italian households decreased by -3.5% in the first quarter as a result of the increased share on the total for leisure footwear and slippers, with lower prices than shoes for formal occasions. Only athletic footwear and sneakers showed an increase in consumption (+7.8% in volume) but it is far from exceptional.

In terms of exports, there were increased flows towards Switzerland (+13% in quantity) and France (+8% in quantity), both of which are linked to outsourced production for international luxury brands, while outside Europe the increase in China (+44.4% in volume and +74.8% in value compared to the first 3 months of 2020), particularly in the higher end of the market (the average price towards this market increased by 21%) especially favoured leading fashion brands. These performances have been buoyed by the country's economic expansion, 'revenge spending' by consumers after the restrictions imposed upon them during the emergency phase of the pandemic, and the direct entrance of goods that had previously moved through Hong Kong (which instead saw a -11.4% reduction in incoming footwear from Italy). Current exports to China are well above pre-Covid levels in 2019 (+11.2% in volume and +24% in value). “These positive performances - continues Badon - stand in contrast to the stagnant trends for some important traditional outlet markets, like Germany (-0.8% in quantity), the US (which followed its -30% drop in 2020 with a modest +3.5% in volume and a -8.6% in value) and Spain (-5.9% in quantity), on top of the collapse in sales in the UK (with a slump of more than 40% compared to January-March 2020)”. The balance of trade for the first three months shows a surplus of 1.13 billion euro (+11.2%), although it is still -4.3% less than it was two years ago.

Trends varied at a regional level. Among the 7 export regions, there were significant increases in value for Tuscany (+28.7% on January-March 2020) and positive results for Veneto (+6.2%), Piedmont (+11.5%) and Puglia (+2.5%). On the other hand, Marche (-11.7% overall, with Fermo and Ascoli in negative territory once again, with -16.5% and -22.7% respectively and a timid +4.5% for Macerata) and Emilia Romagna (-32.1%, with a logistics-linked collapse in Piacenza's flows, -80%, and no change for Forlì-Cesena, +0.5%) experienced new falls. Lombardy (-0.7%) is essentially stable. However, with the sole exception of Piedmont, all regions are below 2019 pre-Covid export levels. In the league table for provinces, there was a giant leap forward for Florence (+44%, with +16% increase compared even with the first quarter of 2019), that sits comfortably in the top spot (with an 18.2% share of the national total). In assessing these figures we do, however, have to consider distortions resulting from situations where there are discrepancies between the manufacturing province/region and the place where export goods are actually dispatched from. This explains the strong recent growth (thanks to new logistics sites, that are often linked to online sales or storage facilities for luxury brand multinationals) in exports from areas that do not have a deep tradition in footwear manufacturing; as well as the sudden slumps.

Finally, in terms of company demographics, at the end of March there were 4,097 active footwear manufacturers in Italy, across both industrial and craft sectors (55 less than in December 2020, which corresponds to -1.3%) and a workforce of 71,644 (-238 or 0.3% less). When component manufacturers are taken into account, the fall compared to the final balance for 2020 is even more marked: -123 enterprises and -587 employees. These figures do raise some concern for the stability of employment in coming months, especially when the ban on dismissals is lifted. The wage support hours (CIG) authorised by INPS in the first four months of the year for companies in the Leather Supply Chain remain exceptionally high - 24 million - despite being -6.8% down on the same period last year. To put this in context, in the same period two years ago, prior to the outbreak of the pandemic, there had been 2.8 million authorised hours, while 10.3 million hours were authorised in 2010, at the height of the global economic crisis. Campania (+53%), Emilia Romagna (+28.5%) and Umbria (+92%) are the regions with the biggest increases compared to 2020. Tuscany (-2.2%) is the region with the highest number of hours authorised in the quarter (6.1 million), followed by Campania (5.1 million) and Marche (3.7 million hours).


Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1510) 07.07.21-3
ASSOCALZATURIFICI: INDUSTRY RESILIENCE, SUSTAINABILITY, EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

Assocalzaturifici held its Annual Meeting the past few days in Bologna. The meeting had to be held behind closed doors due to the pandemic, but the issues discussed will be the focus of an event to be attended in person at the end of the year.

At the meeting, Chair Siro Badon emphasised the impact of Covid-19 on the footwear industry, one of the hardest-hit sectors of production, along with other components of the Italian Textiles, Fashion and Accessories sector.

In 2020 the sector lost about 1/4 of its total turnover (with the final balance being 10.72 billion euro, -25.2% compared to 2019) and national production. There were sharp reductions in both foreign trade and domestic consumption. After the collapse in levels of business during the first part of the year, as a result of the lockdown, there was just some respite in the severity of the decline in the next two quarters (although this still remained in double-digit territory), as opposed to a V-shaped recovery.

At this time of crisis, Assocalzaturifici has come up with plenty of challenging new projects for its members.

Sustainability is definitely one of our top priorities,” explains Badon. “We have come up with a project supporting our members and other companies in the process of accreditation and commercial positioning of their businesses as sustainable and therefore highly competitive companies on Italian and international markets”. Assocalzaturifici has registered its own Sustainability trademark (VCS – Verified & Certified Steps), which may be granted to companies capable of achieving a quality standard based on certain requirements. The project will begin with a self-assessment which companies can conduct independently; we will then have reference benchmarks that tell us what the minimum criteria are to be considered a sustainable enterprise. Companies ranking above the bar will then be eligible for certification by the institute we appoint. Companies that do not meet the minimum requirements will be able to rely on the professional assistance of CIMAC, the Assocalzaturifici laboratory that has been conducting testing and certification to guarantee the quality and safety of fashion products for more than 30 years. CIMAC can help businesses begin, continue or improve internal processes aimed at meeting the requirements for sustainability certification.

The financial sustainability of the industry also plays a large part in determining its future. This is the gist of the agreement signed by Assocalzaturifici and Unicredit. Under the FinDynamic project for Assocalzaturifici, agreements will be set up all along the supply chain to ensure that the cash flow of the head of the supply chain is put to work to support virtuous suppliers through a dynamic discount system. Supply chain management will be automatically entrusted to a high-tech platform. This innovative approach responds to two needs, protecting the footwear industry while innovating business processes.

“Another issue is reorganisation of know-how within companies,” emphasises Badon. “The important agreement signed with the President of Umana, Maria Raffaella Caprioglio, will allow us to redefine how people are organised in companies as they get going again after the crisis. Umana will allow us to encourage development of the profiles that are least appropriate, locate and train people who have the new skills required to respond to the challenges of industry and commerce today, and promote inclusion of new employees with the skills required in the post-pandemic market. Training, a theme of great importance to Assocalzaturifici ,” continues Badon, “will be based on company’s real needs”.

Another important agreement was signed with one of the world’s most prominent startup accelerators: Startup Boot Camp Fashion Tech. As Badon explains, “With them, the Association will be able to count on an international organisation that helps us select, incubate and accelerate two start-ups a year which technologically promote and facilitate sustainability in our own specific industry and help MICAM through the long process of digitalisation”.

In addition, the Association looks toward the future with three innovative projects for Assocalzaturifici’s 550 or more member companies: one for creating a digital match between global demand for Italian know-how and industries and artisans capable of offering the immense added value of this unique know-how; one for building a true marketplace for consumers open to companies ideally representing the excellence of Italian manufacturing; and one using blockchain technology to ensure product traceability, on which the Association is working with a leading Italian consortium that has already completed a number of projects for the luxury sector.

Last, but by no means least in importance, is the study commissioned of Università Ca Foscari in Venice in partnership with M&C Saatchi. “Recognition of the prestigious label ‘Made in Italy’ is of critical importance for our economy,” notes Badon. “I’m very proud to say that I am working on this area with Professor Carlo Bagnoli, professor of strategic innovation at Università Ca Foscari in Venice and founder of strategy innovation srl.

They will conduct a study of the ‘Made in Italy’ label for Assocalzaturifici, with the support of communications agency M&C Saatchi, in order to understand what challenges face us in the future, how companies are positioned, and how they can concentrate their efforts, by analysing the qualities major world markets attribute to Italian-made shoes”. The study will be the key theme of a convention which Assocalzaturifici will hold at the end of the year.

Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1508) 24.06.21-4
Newsletter Assocalzaturifici, Giugno 2021

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Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1491) 14.05.21-5
MICAM, THE INTERNATIONAL FOOTWEAR SHOW,
IS READY TO GET STARTED AGAIN IN MILAN
FROM 19 TO 21 SEPTEMBER 2021

“The government’s recent announcement of a date for starting physical trade fair events again makes us cautiously optimistic about the future,” says Assocalzaturifici and MICAM Chair Siro Badon. “Starting up this virtuous system again, at the service of enterprises and the exports that result from trade fairs, means relaunching the whole industry on world markets,” explains Badon. “We’re working on an edition concentrated in a new three-day formula rather than the usual four days, guaranteeing perfect safety under protocols developed with Fiera Milano. MICAM is the first business opportunity of decisive importance for our member companies, a privileged venue for negotiating orders and opening up opportunities for growth and penetration of new markets. It is essential for relaunching a crucial sector of Italian industry and our economy, a sector of production that suffered great difficulty in 2020 as a result of the pandemic”.

While awaiting the resumption of physical trade fairs, MICAM has reinforced its digital event. MICAM Milano Digital Show was held from 8 March to 8 May 2021 with the participation of more than 90 brands; over 5,000 buyers from all over the world visited the platform and used it to conduct business. This digital tool will continue to be an essential part of an advanced strategy for adaptation to the changes on the market requiring planning, organisation and an ability to continue restocking and renewing the product assortment more frequently, rapidly presenting new products to customers at various times throughout the year.

“We’re happy with the second edition of MICAM Milano Digital Show,” comments MICAM CEO Tommaso Cancellara. “We implemented communication initiatives focusing buyers’ attention on the brands in the platform. More than 5000 buyers registered, visiting over 35,000 pages and generating almost 2,000 requests to connect with brands; traffic was 60% higher than in the previous edition. We noted a lot of interest in winter footwear, particularly boots and ankle boots, but also on comfortable shoes and sports footwear, demonstrating that the pandemic has truly changed the way we work and live our lives. In addition, the range of goods on offer was flanked by top-quality virtual content thanks to MICAMX, MICAM’s laboratory for innovation in footwear. Over the eight weeks we broadcast more than 50 presentations based on the 4 pillars of MICAMX: sustainability, trends and materials, the future of retail, and art, fashion heritage & future. MICAM Milano Digital Show will continue in the seasons to come, alongside the physical trade fairs that are so important to our industry”.

MICAM Milano is coming up from 19 to 21 September 2021 at Fiera Milano Rho, where it will take place in perfect safety. We look forward to seeing you there!

#micam
#strongertogether
#micamtales

Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1484) 25.04.21-6
Newsletter Assocalzaturifici, Aprile 2021

 

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Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1473) 25.03.21-7
 
ASSOCALZATURIFICI ORGANISES A COLLECTIVE OF ITALIAN COMPANIES AT THE AYMOD INTERNATIONAL FAIR IN TURKEY

The Chair Siro Badon: “Now, more than ever, we need to support Italian manufacturing abroad, as this is the only driver for the post-Covid economic recovery”



Italian shoes land in Turkey. Assocalzaturifici is organising a collective of Italian companies for the Aymod international fair, which is scheduled to take place in Istanbul between 31 March and 3 April 2021. A total of fourteen companies will be participating and represent some of the most important Italian footwear brands. “Turkey is a leading manufacturer, but it is also a market with great potential – states Siro Badon, Chair of Assocalzaturifici – It is the 6th largest global footwear manufacturer in terms of volume, with 535 million pairs produced in 2019, and is also the 6th largest exporter, with 275 million pairs. However, local products cater to a very different market segment than Italian shoes. According to calculations by the Confindustria Moda Research Centre based on ISTAT data, in the first 11 months of 2020, Italy exported 760,242 pairs of shoes (-9.1%, a reduction that was less severe than many other markets, in this very difficult year) for a corresponding value of 42.08 million euro (-14.3%), with an average price per pair of 55.35 euro (-5.7%). The top three Italian exporting regions are Lombardy, Veneto and Marche, which account for 64% of total exports. Despite the difficult economic situation Turkey is currently experiencing, this is a market that should not be overlooked for our medium-high quality footwear production and it is also a country that can be reached safely even during the pandemic. For this reason, we continue to support our companies in their internationalisation efforts in Turkey and other important markets, by helping them attend foreign trade fairs, which still represents a great opportunity to come into contact with local players from the sector and improve business prospects.”

Assocalzaturifici remains committed to supporting the sector through the Micam Milano Digital Show, which opened last week, and a densely-packed programme of online b2b events for companies, as well as through its constant active coverage of the main export markets.

“Unlike many other countries in the Euro-Asiatic area, Turkey has kept its borders open for business travel from and to certain strategic markets, like Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia. – Badon continues– The creation of these green corridors represents, at this time, an interesting solution for restoring contacts with customers who we are unable to meet in person in Italy or in their countries of origin. We should also not forget that Turkey is still one of the leading global manufacturers and AYMOD continues to be a regional hub with a significant influence over trade, particularly with the Middle East. It is a young and dynamic country that wants to maintain its key role within the fashion and footwear supply chain. As the representative for the leading European footwear manufacturing industry, Assocalzaturifici believes it is important to maintain a constructive and forward-looking relationship with Turkey in years to come. It is our duty to try to help our companies reach and find new customers. Now, more than ever, we need to support Italian products abroad, as this is the only driver for the post-Covid economic recovery”.


Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1472)-8

 

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Newsletter Marzo 2021 

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L’industria calzaturiera nel 2020
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Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1462)-9
THE FOOTWEAR INDUSTRY: SHARP FALL IN TURNOVER (-25.2%), PRODUCTION (-24.6% IN VALUE TERMS) AND EXPORTS (-14.7% IN VALUE TERMS) IN 2020.

Siro Badon, Chair of Assocalzaturifici: “As well as losing about 1/4 of national production and turnover, we also have to report a severe reduction in consumption by Italian households, in both expenditure (-23.1%) and volumes
(-17.4%)


The snapshot for the sector from the Confindustria Moda Research Centre for Assocalzaturifici

The Covid-19 pandemic has hit the Italian footwear industry hard, with double-digit reductions across all the main variables. According to the latest figures from Confindustria Moda Research Centre for Assocalzaturifici, compared to 2019, turnover in 2020 was down to 10.72 billion euro (-25.2%) and Italian production fell to 130.5 million pairs (-27.1%). There was also a significant decrease in exports, in terms of both value (-14.7%) and volume (-17.4%).

“The year 2020 had severe economic consequences for our sector - explains Assocalzaturifici’s Chair, Siro Badon. - The data is clear. As well as losing about 1/4 of national production and turnover, we also have to report a severe reduction in consumption by Italian households, in both expenditure (-23.1%) and volumes (-17.4%). This was a major drop, despite a double-digit increase in online sales, which was not sufficient to offset the collapse of sales linked with tourism in Italy, especially in the luxury segments. And if we factor in the criticalities emerging from the company demographics - with reductions of -4% in both the number of companies and the direct workforce, as well as a spike in wage support (C.I.G.) in the Leather Area (+900% in the number of authorised hours, ten times 2019 levels) - the picture is anything but comforting”.

Assocalzaturifici’s report looks in detail at exports, with this analysis revealing that of the top 10 foreign markets in value terms, there was an increase for South Korea alone (+14.3% in the first 11 months), although it too was down -5.2% in quantity. Losses were more limited in Switzerland (-7.6%, the destination for products produced by subcontractors for international luxury brands) and China (-4.4%), which saw a strong recovery (+43%) in the two-month period October-November. There was a marked reduction in sales towards partners within the European Union (-13% in value for the EU27) and outside the EU (-18%), where North America saw a loss of -30% in value, with -20% for the CIS area, -25% for the Middle East and -13% for the Far East. The balance of trade surplus is expected to fall to 4.2 billion euro (a -14% reduction compared to 2019).

 

Assocalzaturifici - Trade Association for Italian Shoemakers (Z1421)-10
THE ITALIAN FOOTWEAR INDUSTRY: IN THE FIRST HALF OF 2020 THERE WAS A FALL IN PRODUCTION (-34.9%) AND TURNOVER (-36.3%)
Siro Badon, Chair of Assocalzaturifici: “Household spending fell by -30%, despite the boom in online sales (+42%) due to the closing of shops during the lockdown. The restart after the loosening of restrictions is proving difficult”

Slowdown in exports: in the first six months -26.4% in quantity and -25.4% in value (with average prices up slightly, +1.3%)

The first half of the year was difficult for the Italian footwear manufacturing sector as it was severely tested by the pandemic: the Istat industrial production index fell by -34.9%, while company turnover fell by -36.3% according to the sample conducted with Members. The snapshot for the sector emerges from the report prepared by the Confindustria Moda Research Centre for Assocalzaturifici, which was presented to the industry’s professionals and the media during the Press Conference for Micam.

“The health emergency has had a major impact on the performance of our production sector – explains Siro Badon, Chair of Assocalzaturifici–. Aside from the reduction in output and turnover, there was also a marked drop in domestic consumption and exports. Household spending fell by -30%, despite the boom in online sales (+42%) due to the closing of shops during the lockdown. Exports also fared poorly: -22% in volume for EU markets, which account for 2 pairs of shoes out of every 3 sold abroad, and -33.4% in volume for non-EU markets, with the balance of trade down significantly (-34%) but still showing a surplus of 1.6 billion Euro. The post lockdown restart, after the loosening of restrictions, is proving to be extremely slow: sales in Italy are still down (-29% in quantity in May and -7% in June), whereas exports were down - 27% in volume for May and June after the collapse (-50%) in the previous two months. The bad news also extends to employment with a decrease in both the number of companies (-77 since January) and the workforce (-520). These figures should set the alarm bells ringing in terms of employment trends in coming months. Our production system, which mainly comprises small and medium/small businesses, has been severely tested, having been forced to contend with a lack of liquidity caused by the cancellation of orders, returns and unpaid invoices. I therefore hope that this edition of Micam, which will be one of the first major events to feature attendees after the lockdown, can truly represent a breath of fresh air for our companies. Meetings at the trade fair still represent the most important opportunity for growth on the market and the best way of negotiating orders”.

In terms of exports, the Istat data show a reduction in quantity of -26.4% and a -25.4% reduction in value terms for the first 6 months of the year. A total of 78.7 million were exported for a value of 3.8 billion – including pure commercialisation transactions – which represented a drop of more than 28 million pairs compared to the first six months of 2019. To understand how exceptional the current situation is, it is sufficient to state that these volumes are 24% lower than for the same period in 2009, in the full throes of the global economic crisis (when footwear exports amounted to 104 million pairs)

There were across-the-board reductions across global markets, with very few exceptions: among the main destination markets there were increases only for Poland and Portugal (which lost 11.4% in value terms); South Korea had a +0.6% in value, with -4.6% in quantity. There is a prevalence of negative figures everywhere. Germany, the number one market in volume terms, that had already shown a negative trends in 2019, fell by 17%, for both volume and value. There were strong falls in flows towards China and Hong Kong (-31.4% and -44.1% in value respectively) with the Far East losing about 30% on the whole, in both quantity and value. There was a significant slip in the CIS markets (-37% in volume and -30% in value); performance was bad in the US (almost -40%) and the Middle East (-26% in quantity). Volume towards Switzerland (the traditional logistics and distribution hub for the major international luxury brands) fell by about a quarter and there was a fall of about a third towards France (another main destination for contract manufacturing), the countries occupying the first two spots in the value league table.

The assessment by merceological type highlights reductions of more than 20% in volume for all segments, except for the residual segment of footwear with rubber uppers (-1%): there were reductions of just over -30% for leather shoes (with similar falls, i.e. -34%, for the men and women segments and -30% for children's shoes); -23% in quantity for shoes made in fabric; - 21% for synthetic shoes and -38% for slippers.

Breaking the figures (for footwear + parts, in value terms only) down on a geographical level, there were significant falls during the first half of the year for all the main exporting regions, with the sole exception of Emilia Romagna (+20%) which was driven by Piacenza, a logistics and distribution hub that has been growing constantly in recent years given its fundamental importance in the delivery of goods purchased online. The biggest reductions concerned Tuscany (-44%), the Marche (that fell by -32.5% on the whole, with Fermo and Macerata falling by -31% and Ascoli Piceno falling -39%) and Campania (-34%). There were reductions in line with the national average for Lombardy (-25.1%), that fared slightly worse than Veneto (-20.2%, this is Italy’s biggest exporting region with a share of 27.4% on the total value of Italian exports), Puglia (-22,2%) and Piedmont (-20.9%). Florence remains the leading province for exports despite losing -43.7% on a year-on-year basis during the first six months of 2020.

In terms of company birth rates and employment, the report revealed that in July 10% of companies still had their staff working remotely. For footwear manufacturers, at the end of June 2020, there were 4,249 companies and a workforce of 74,370 in Italy across industrial and craftsmanship sectors (with a decrease of -77 companies and -520 workers compared to December 2019). Considering also components, the reduction from the start of the year increases to -161 companies and -1295 workers according to Infocamere-Movimprese.

The use of CIG wage support increased significantly in the Leather Area: on the whole, for the first six months of 2020, a total of just under 39 million hours were authorised, a jump of +878% compared to the number of authorised hours during the first half of 2019 (4 million). This was almost 5 times the number of hours authorised during 2019 as a whole (8.3 million hours).

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